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coconut beef curry

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HELLO INTERNET FRIENDS!!! I’m so sorry for being MIA over the past couple of months. No excuse. Just busy. You know.

Anyways, I’m back now after a fall full of, well, life. There was foliage, hiking, sweater-buying, and pumpkin bread-making. There were travels and birthdays (my own included- hello, late 20s!) and time spent with family and friends. There was Thanksgiving. There was an election. Fall is always such a fleeting season, one where we (or at least I) feel the need to PACK IN ALL THE THINGS. On top of it all, there is so much to think about, so much to digest about what is changing and happening in our country and in the world.

Winter feels a little more final. The temps dropped this week, and it’s like we’re all saying “welp, we knew it could happen any day, and now it’s here.” Might as well embrace it and hunker down for the season, always fighting for joy and peace, and clinging to hope in the midst of all the changes. A bowl of warm curry always helps, so here I am!

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*Special shout out to my roommate, who let me use this beautiful photogenic bowl, handmade by her sister! Thanks Megan!!

coconut beef curry

Ingredients:
2 lbs beef chuck, cubed
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 cup slices carrots
1/2 onion, sliced
1 shallot, sliced
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 tsp fresh grated ginger
2 Tbsp red curry paste
1 can full fat coconut milk
1 cup vegetable broth
2 tsp dark brown sugar
2 Tbsp fresh lime juice
2 tsp fish sauce
1/2 cup torn basil (Thai basil if available)
1/2 cup cilantro leaves
1/2 tsp salt
2 cups Jasmine rice

Directions:
1. Prep all ingredients: peel/chop carrots, slice onion and shallot, mince garlic, peel and grate ginger, and cube beef, discarding fat as able.
2. Heat a large skillet (use one that is ~2 inches deep) to medium. Salt beef cubes as desired, then cook in the skillet until browned all over. Set aside in a covered bowl.
3. Heat oil (I used olive oil) in the same skillet over medium heat. Cook onions, shallot, garlic, and carrots until onions begin to caramelize, about 5-8 minutes. Add the ginger and curry paste and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes.
4. Return the beef to the pan and add the stock, sugar, and coconut milk. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 1 hour, covered.
5. Uncover and cook for another 45 minutes, or until curry is looking like it is thickening (I added about 1 tsp of flour just to help speed this process). Add the lime juice and fish sauce. Cook, stirring, until heated. Stir in basil and cilantro. Add salt to taste.
6. Make Jasmine rice as directed; I combined 1 cup rice with 2 cups water and 1 tsp butter in a pot, brought this to a boil, then covered and let simmer for 18-20 minutes. Fluff with fork when done.
7. Serve curry over rice; garnish with fresh cilantro, basil, and/or lime wedges.

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balsamic peach summer flatbread

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And here we are in September. How did we do on those summer bucket list items we talked about last month?? Are you all as exhausted as I am now??

August was excellent for me. I went to LA for a big family get-together (#reyoonion2016), spent time at the beach, was really into morning running/avoiding having to work out in the swampy afternoon humidity, moved apartments (only 5 blocks away but OOF what a process), and, to christen the little oven in my new place, made this flatbread with summer things (peaches! corn! heirloom tomatoes! fresh mozzarella!).

I love the fact that nature provides us with so much richness in both flavor and nutrition each season. Seasonal produce is the best. I am totally gearing up and getting real excited for the fall harvest, but I sure am going to miss the beautiful summer fruits and vegetables that rocked the farmer’s markets this year. But hey, it’s not Labor Day quite yet, so grab yourself some summer produce while it’s still phresh as heck, make yourself a summer-y flatbread, and bring the leftovers along on one last beach trip!

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balsamic peach, corn, and chicken flatbread

  • Servings: 4-8
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Ingredients:
1 frozen or hand-prepared pizza dough (I used Whole Foods sprouted black bean dough)
8oz can of corn kernels (I only used half of the can)
1 ripe, medium sized peach
1 medium heirloom tomato
1 package fresh mozzarella cheese
Few leaves of fresh basil
1-2 small chicken breasts
1 clove garlic, minced
1 Tbsp fresh or dried rosemary
1 Tbsp olive oil
Salt, to taste
Balsamic dijon dressing (see below)
Balsamic glaze (I used Blaze Fig Balsamic Glaze)
Other herbs as desired, to taste (I used dried basil)

Directions:
1. Remove dough from fridge and let sit for ~30 minutes prior to stretching it out.
2. Prepare chicken: Cut breasts into small 1/2-inch chunks. Place chunks in a sealable bag or bowl. Add olive oil, rosemary, minced garlic, and salt. Let sit for at least 30 minutes to marinate. When marinated, add chicken to a pan and sear over high heat. Flip chicken pieces to sear other side. Then, reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and let cook through.
3. Prepare corn: If using canned corn, drain liquid from corn. Add corn to a pan over medium-high heat and let sear until kernels brown on one side. Flip and reduce heat to medium-low. Remove from heat when both sides of kernels are browned as desired.
4. Slice peaches, tomatoes, and mozzarella. Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.
5. Stretch dough onto a greased baking sheet. Brush with about 2 Tbsp of balsamic dijon dressing. Add tomatoes, mozzarella, peaches, chicken, corn, and fresh basil leaves. Sprinkle with any other herbs desired!
6. Bake flatbread in preheated oven. Bake until crust is golden at edges and cheese is melted.
7. Remove from oven and let cool ~15 minutes. Drizzle with balsamic glaze.

balsamic dijon dressing

  • Servings: 1 cup
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Ingredients:
1/2 cup balsamic vinaigrette
1/2 cup olive oil
1 tbsp whole grain Dijon mustard
1 clove garlic, minced
Juice from 1/2 medium lemon

Directions:
1. Combine all ingredients in a jar. Close jar tightly and shake to mix!

 

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Roasted Cauliflower and Artichoke Freekeh Pilaf with Garlic Lemon Tahini Dressing

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On “trendy” foods: sometimes they’re just not worth the time and money and energy to find and learn to cook. Usually there are more familiar, locally produced and nutritionally comparable items available that can save you a whole lot of hassle. That being said… sometimes the extra effort really is worth it. Sometimes a new food is great not just because of the novelty but because it actually is incredibly satisfying.This has been my experience with freekeh.

But what the freak is freekeh, you ask? Freekeh is an ancient grain originating from the Middle East. It is harvested while it’s young and then lightly roasted, which explains the slightly smoky, nutty flavor which I’ve found to be just delightful. Because the individual grains are firmer than those of rice and larger than those of quinoa, the texture and mouthfeel have more of a bite, making it stand out (in a good way) against these and some of the other more familiar grains. It is a wheat product, so it’s not gluten-free (sorry, gluten-free friends). But, it’s packed with fiber and iron, and contains a good amount of niacin, vitamin B6, and magnesium. Keeps you full for a while, but it’s the good, satisfied kind of full (not the regretful kind of full in which you feel like you’re 8 months pregnant with an oversized food baby).

So yes, freekeh is for keeps. If you’re not quite as delighted by it as I am, or if you don’t tolerate gluten, you could try this pilaf recipe with quinoa or brown rice instead! But you’re missing out, just saying. Call me a freekeh freak, I’m hooked!

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roasted cauliflower and artichoke freekeh pilaf

  • Servings: 4
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Adapted from Cookie and Kate‘s recipe

Ingredients:
Roasted Cauliflower:
-1 large cauliflower head, sliced into bite-sized florets
-2-3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
-salt and pepper to taste

Roasted Artichoke Hearts:
-1 can artichoke hearts, drained and rinsed
-1 clove of garlic, minced
-1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
-salt, pepper, and lemon juice to taste

Freekeh Pilaf:
-1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
-1/4 cup sliced almonds OR 1 small onion, diced
-1 1/4 cup cracked freekeh
-2 cloves of garlic, minced
-1/2 tsp salt
-1/4 tsp cumin
-1/4 tsp coriander
-3 cups + 2 Tbsp low sodium vegetable stock

Directions:
1. Roast artichokes: Drain and rinse can of artichoke hearts. Mix gently with garlic and olive oil. Roast in a glass baking dish at 375F for 1 hr, flipping at around 30 minutes. Add salt, pepper, and lemon juice to taste.
2. Roast cauliflower: Increase oven temp to 425F. Toss the cauliflower florets with olive oil to coat with a light, even layer of oil. Season with salt and pepper and arrange the florets on a large, rimmed baking sheet in a single layer. Roast for 30-35 minutes, tossing halfway (at about 15 minutes) until the florets are deeply golden on the edges.
3. Cook freekeh: Warm 1 Tbsp olive oil in a heavy bottomed saucepan. Add almonds or onions and cook, stirring occasionally until almonds are fragrant or onions are translucent (approximately 3 minutes). Add the freekeh and saute 2 minutes, then add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and salt. Saute for 1 minute. Add the vegetable stock, raise the heat to bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover the pot, and cook, stirring occasionally and reducing the heat as needed to maintain a gentle simmer. Simmer until the freekeh is tender to the bite, about 20-25 minutes, then remove lid and let simmer uncovered another 10 minutes to allow the excess liquid to evaporate. Turn off heat and let sit 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork, season with salt and pepper.
4. Assemble: Top a bed of freekeh pilaf with roasted vegetables, feta cheese, raisins, and any other garnishes/toppings you desire. Drizzle tahini dressing (recipe below) over the dish.
5. Store leftovers: Store leftovers as individual components and assemble after reheating.

garlic lemon tahini dressing

  • Servings: approximately 12
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Ingredients:
1/4 cup tahini
Juice from 1/2 lemon
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt, to taste

Directions:
1. Place all ingredients in a food processor. Puree into a smooth, liquid consistency.
2. Store in air-tight jar or container, keep in fridge for ~1 week.

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roasted carrot & quinoa salad

Hellloooooo, friends. Sorry for the MIA status last month. You know, life. But I’m here! Bearing purple carrots! If you’re not familiar with this particular shade of carrot- don’t fear. This is not some artificial green-eggs-and-ham type situation involving sketchy ingredients like Red #40. Purple carrots are au natural. In fact, the original color of carrots, which are thought to have been first cultivated in the Afghanistan region, actually is this lovely purple. And in the nutrition world, purple produce means anthocyanins. Which means antioxidants, anti-inflammation, and many other potential health benefits. And they’re super tasty. So there you have it. Eating the rainbow has never been so delightful. Hope you enjoy!

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roasted carrot and quinoa salad

  • Servings: 4
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Ingredients:
10-12 medium-large carrots
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt
2 cups quinoa
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
Spiced chickpeas and kale, see recipe below
Garlic lemon tahini dressing, see recipe below

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Wash and peel carrots. Cut into sticks, approximately 1/4 inch thick. Place in a large bowl, and toss with olive oil and pinch of salt. Spread carrot sticks in a single layer on a baking sheet. Roast in oven for 20 minutes, flip, and continue roasting another 10 minutes. Remove from oven when tender and starting to become golden-brown.
2. While carrots are roasting, make spiced chickpeas and kale, garlic tahini dressing, and quinoa (follow directions on package. I use a rice cooker with a ratio of 1 part dry quinoa: 2 parts water).
3. When all components of salad are prepared, serve quinoa in bowls, place chickpeas/kale and roasted carrots on top. Sprinkle with feta cheese. Drizzle dressing on top.

spiced chickpeas and kale

  • Servings: 4
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Ingredients:
1 small clove garlic
2 cups baby kale
1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
1/2 tsp of: coriander, paprika, allspice
Dash of: onion powder, cumin, salt, and black pepper
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Directions:
1. Drain chickpeas, leaving a small amount of liquid from the can. Place chickpeas with the liquid in a medium sized bowl and add the spices. Toss to coat.
2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Mince garlic. Place garlic and kale in the skillet and stir until kale is wilted. Turn heat to low. Add spiced chickpeas to skillet and stir to mix. Cover with lid and keep warm until ready to serve.

garlic lemon tahini dressing

  • Servings: approximately 12
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Ingredients:
1/4 cup tahini
Juice from 1/2 lemon
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt, to taste

Directions:
1. Place all ingredients in a food processor. Puree into a smooth, liquid consistency.
2. Store in air-tight jar or container, keep in fridge for ~1 week.

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winter vegetable crostata

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Not gonna lie, I’ve been pretty jealous of all you states that got buried in snow this past week. All those Instagram photos of your blizzard brunches, buried cars, and snow frolics had me asking “what about Boston?!”

But comparison is the thief of joy, and I’m realizing in even bigger and more important ways that where I am right now, not only geographically but in life, is right where I’m supposed to be. Adulthood is weird. The more distance I gain from my school years, the more my view of a “standard trajectory” for life becomes blurred. Many of my friends are getting married, some are even having kids (!); some are starting businesses, others are climbing the corporate ladder, some are applying for higher education programs, others are still in school, some have never left the Northeastern corner of the US, and others are traveling the world. There’s no “supposed to be” in life, and that can be unsettling for someone like me, who has always subconsciously gauged her success by how she measures up to what everyone else is doing. I’ve realized recently that I’m definitely not where I wanted to be or thought I would be in life by the time I reached my mid-twenties, and seeing others “achieving” those things that I thought I would have by this time- it’s so easy to be jealous. I could drive myself crazy thinking about how supremely arbitrary- and sometimes unfair- the way people’s lives turn out seems. In the end, though, it seems that we need to accept that we do not have control. I can let myself get depressed about that, or I can take what’s in front of me now and run with it, pour myself into it, learn from it, press into it, and trust that the One who is in control has, in ways that I do not really understand yet, got me.

And so this weekend, while in some parts of the country, folks were emptying grocery store shelves and frolicking in Narnia-like scenery, I was here, going about life as usual, enjoying the seasonal produce at the winter farmer’s market in town, watching snowflakes fall calmly from my kitchen window, and remembering how freaking privileged and blessed I actually am to have a life with so much possibility open to me. There’s so much life left to live, even now, at the (*insert sarcastic tone*) RIPE OLD age of 26.

I went out last night and saw that the “1-3 inches” of snow that we were predicted to get turned out to be more like “3+” inches. YAY! Snow and PJs and cozy foods all weekend! I am soaking in all the beauty that is winter, and this winter vegetable crostata is just one way I am learning to enjoy the bounty of the present time. Enjoy!

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winter vegetable crostata

  • Servings: 4-8
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Recipe adapted from Edible Boston
Ingredients:
3 onions, thinly sliced
1 bay leaf
1 large sprig thyme
Extra virgin olive oil
Kosher or sea salt
Fresh ground black pepper
1 small kabocha squash, peeled, de-seeded, and sliced into 1/4 inch slices
2 cloves garlic, minced
8-10 sage leaves, slivered
1 bunch Lacinato kale, stems removed and leaves thinly sliced
Pinch of red pepper flakes, if you like a bit of heat
6-8 oz mushrooms (I used shiitake), sliced into bite sized pieces
1 Tbsp thyme leaves
Pinch nutmeg
~1/2 cup grated local Alpine-style cheese, like Gruyere or Comte
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 egg, beaten
1/2 pie crust recipe, see separate recipe below

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
2. Saute onions: In a heavy skillet, heat 2 Tbsp olive oil and add onions, bay leaf, and sprig of thyme. Season with salt and pinch of sugar and allow onions to caramelize, stirring occasionally, until browned, at least 20-30 minutes. Remove bay leaf and thyme sprig and set aside.
3. Roast squash: Toss sliced squash in a bowl with olive oil to coat, 1/4 tsp salt, pinch of black pepper, half of the minced garlic, and the sage. Arrange slices on a baking sheet (can line with parchment or spray lightly with olive oil cooking spray). Roast squash in oven for 15 minutes, or until edges have begun to brown and squash is soft all the way through.
4. Saute kale/mushrooms: Heat 2 Tbsp in oil in another skillet and add the kale leaves and remaining garlic, seasoning with salt and optional red pepper flakes and tossing until wilted and softened (about 8-10 min). You can add a Tbsp of water to help it along if needed. Remove the kale from the pan into a bowl and add mushrooms to the bowl with a pinch of salt. Toss to combine, then add back to pan over medium heat. Cook until mushrooms give up their liquid and begin to crisp a bit. Remove from heat and set aside.
5. Roll out crust: On a large sheet of parchment paper or floured surface, roll out the dough to about a 12 inch round. Transfer the round and parchment (if using) to a baking sheet and chill 5 minutes in freezer.
6. Assemble crostata: Spread cooled caramelized onions in the middle of the dough, leaving about 2 inches at the edge. Top with an even layer of the sliced squash and sprinkle with some thyme leaves, nutmeg, and 2/3 of the grated cheese. Arrange the kale and mushroom mixture on top and sprinkle with more thyme and remainder of cheese.
Fold the outer 2 inches of the dough in over the filling; flute the folds if you’d like. Whisk together the heavy cream and beaten egg and pour over the filling, being careful not to let it spill out of the crostata (dribble it in a little at a time and allow it to settle in between additions)
7. Bake in oven heated to 400 degrees F for 30-35 minutes, until center is bubbly and crust is golden brown. Let cool at least 15 minutes before slicing and serving.

PÂTE BRISÉE

  • Servings: 2 pie crusts
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Ingredients:
1.5 cup white all purpose flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
2 sticks of ice-cold butter, diced into 1/2″ cubes
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

Directions:
1. Place flour, salt, and sugar in a bowl; blend with a whisk
2. Add butter pieces and work quickly with hands to work butter into flour mixture; breaking up butter chunks with fingers, some pieces will be the size of peas and others the size of oat flakes.
3. Drizzle in the ice water and apple cider vinegar and use a fork and/or your hands to bring the dough together, aiming to moisten all the flour bits.
4. Dump flour mixture (which should be moist and shaggy) onto a lightly floured surface. Divide dough into two and gently knead each piece into a disk. Wrap each disk in plastic wrap and refrigerate for ~1 hr or longer, until ready for use.

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kale, potato, and goat cheese quiche (with whole wheat crust)

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“I believe like a child that suffering will be healed and made up for, that all the humiliating absurdity of human contradictions will vanish like a pitiful mirage, like the despicable fabrication of the impotent and infinitely small Euclidian mind of man, that in the world’s finale, at the moment of eternal harmony, something so precious will come to pass that it will suffice for all hearts, for the comforting of all resentments, for the atonement of all the crimes of humanity, for all the blood that they’ve shed; that it will make it possible not only to forgive but to justify all that has happened.” -Fyodor Dostoyevski, The Brothers Karamazov

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I’m embracing fall, and feeling great about it. This weekend I gawked at squashes and gourd things at the farmer’s market, wore flannel, and drank pumpkin beer. Autumnal activities aside, though, I’m entering into the season with a whole lot of hope and positivity, and if you’ve had the misfortune of having asked me how I’ve been anytime in the last month, you know that this newfound optimism has been quite a remarkable shift in attitude. You see, I faced some disappointments this summer, and they were the sorts of things that really were nobody’s fault. They just were what they were. At first I was simply very sad, but then I also started to feel a sense of injustice about it all. I had no control over the things that happened- why, then, was I left feeling this down? And then, suddenly, everything that is wrong in the world came into clearer focus and I became even more sad and bitter. Why is there suffering at all? Why does everything have to fall apart, no matter how hard we try to scotch-tape them back together? If God says He is enough, then why do I feel so empty and why is the world still a mess?

These are big questions, and I don’t have the answers to them. BUT, there’s been a strikingly clear theme in the things I’ve been hearing and reading and seeing more recently. And that’s the fact that the world in its current broken state is not how God created it to be, and that things will be made right again. I think there is a God who is sad with us when we suffer, has been angry even before us about how messed up things can be, and has plans to fix them, perhaps using people to do some of this work. Things will be made right. This is not simply some religious crutch or comforting platitude that Christians use to get through the hard times in life. Or maybe it is, but who in reality doesn’t need a crutch? We have to lean on something, so why not lean on truth? I do believe that God will right all the wrongs. It’s truth. It is what it is.

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I made a quiche with some things that I bought at the farmers market where my squash-gawking occurred this weekend. I wasn’t planning on sharing it, but 1. it ended up being tastier than I expected, and 2. the autumnal feel of it seemed appropriate for ushering in ALL OF THE FALL YUMMIES that are surely going to be filling the kitchen soon (all 3 of my housemates are excellent cooks, and I have accepted that I will be living in stretchy pants from now until next May). I hope you enjoy it and this wonderful season as much as I am.

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kale potato and goat cheese quiche with whole wheat crust

Ingredients:
For the crust (Adapted from Joy the Baker’s Five Tips for Making the Best All-Butter Pie Crust)
2.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 Tbsp granulated sugar
3/4 tsp salt
1 cup (2 sticks) cold butter, cubed and chilling in fridge until use
1/2 cup cold buttermilk

For the quiche:
Potatoes of choice (I used small white potatoes), washed thoroughly and cubed, ~1 cup of potato cubes
Olive oil to coat potatoes while roasting, about 2 Tbsp
Salt, pepper, and oregano to taste
4-5 leaves Tuscan kale, rinsed, torn, and massaged with dash of sea salt
1 clove garlic, minced
Olive oil to saute kale, about 1-2 Tbsp
5 eggs (I used ~7-8 egg whites)
1/2 cup light or heavy cream
Salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste
4-5 Tbsp crumbled goat cheese
1/2-1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Directions
Crust:
1. In medium bowl, whisk flour, sugar, and salt. Add butter cubes and work them into the flour mixture with your (clean!) fingers until butter is broken down and incorporated in. Work quickly! Some of the butter pieces will look like oat flakes, while some will look like peas.
2. Create a well in the mixture and pour in the buttermilk. Use a fork to bring it together, try to moisten all the bits of flour mixture.
3. Dump the mixture onto a lightly floured surface; it will look shaggy- that’s ok! Knead the dough together with your hands a few times, but try not to overwork it. Knead into a disk, wrap with plastic wrap and let chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour.
4. When you’re ready to assemble the quiche, take the disk out of the fridge and roll out into a 13 inch circle with a rolling pin on a lightly floured surface. It won’t be a perfect circle, but that’s ok! Move the dough around/flip it frequently to ensure that it’s not sticking to the work surface.
5. Place the crust into a greased pie tin (I used a cake pan), crimp edges as desired.

Quiche:
1. Roast potatoes: Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F. Place the cubed potatoes on a baking sheet, coat with olive oil, and toss with salt, pepper, and oregano (or any other spices desired). Roast in oven until tender (about 20-25 min). Once done roasting potatoes, reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F.
2. Saute kale: Heat olive oil in a pan over medium heat. Once hot, saute garlic and kale until kale is wilted (about 5-7 min).
3. Prepare egg filling: Whisk eggs/egg whites with cream in a medium bowl. Add pinch of red pepper flakes, salt, and pepper to taste.
4. Assemble quiche: Sprinkle 1/2 of the shredded cheddar cheese onto bottom of prepared quiche crust. Layer potatoes, kale, goat cheese on top. Pour in the prepared egg mixture, then sprinkle remaining cheese on top.
5. Bake  in oven (preheated to 375 degrees F) for ~30 minutes. Broil for 1 minute to get nice browning on top. Remove from oven, let cool ~15-20 minutes before serving.

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balsamic black plum and ricotta pizza

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Every year, it seems like we start the summer already with a mental countdown of the days, a keen sense of awareness of how transient they are. And sure enough, summer flies by and you find yourself at the end of August, panicked that you haven’t done all the outdoor activities possible only when the sun’s out, or taken advantage of all the fresh produce in season because you’ve been too busy sweating it out by making cakes for months. Wait, is that just me? Ok fine.

I made up for lost time by going to the beach AND a barbecue this weekend, so I’m doing ok on the activities front. And I went crazy in the Whole Foods stone fruit section earlier in the week, the result of that eventually becoming, among other things, this pizza! I even brought a few slices with me to the beach. Check, check, and CHECK.

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balsamic black plum and ricotta pizza

  • Servings: 4
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Ingredients:
1 whole wheat pizza dough (I used Whole Foods brand)
3/4 cup pizza sauce
3/4 cup ricotta cheese
2 small black plums
Handful of arugula
2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
Sprinkle of oregano

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Spread thin layer of oil on a baking sheet or pizza stone
2. Stretch pizza dough into circle or rectangle on baking sheet or pizza stone
3. Spread pizza sauce on dough
4. Place spoonfuls of ricotta on top of tomato sauce, and spread as desired over expanse of dough
5. Drizzle balsamic over the pizza
6. Evenly place arugula over the pizza
7. Slice plums into thin slices and place on top of the arugula
8. Sprinkle oregano over the pizza
9. Bake for approximately 10 minutes, or until crust turns a golden brown color
10. Let cool, slice, and serve

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